Kippas - Jarmulkas

37 items total
Knit kippa - white
In stock
Code: 51883
€12,60

White breathable kippa . Very suitable for wedding,  Bar micva, or even casual wear.

Code: 51883
Knit kippa - COLOR
In stock
Code: 36483
€13,50

One size fits all.

Code: 36483
Knit kippa - Star of David BIG
€13,50

One size fits all.

Code: 36485
Knit kippa black and white
In stock
Code: 84075
€13,50
Code: 84075
Knit kippa black with colors
In stock
Code: 40214
€13,50

Funny knit kippa black with colors.

Code: 40214
Knit kippa blue
Tip
In stock
Code: 84076
€13,50
Code: 84076
Knit kippa brown and black
In stock
Code: 40295
€13,50

Knit kippa brown and black flower pattern. 

Code: 40295
Knit kippa colorful
Tip
In stock
Code: 84077
€13,50
Code: 84077
Knit kippa white and green and blue
€13,50
Code: 40788
White kippa decorated by silver stitching
€13,50

Chic white kippa made in  Israel. 

Code: 185541
Black knit kippa with hem
New Tip
In stock
Code: 92999
€16,47
Code: 92999
Black textile kippa
New Tip
Momentálně nedostupné
Code: 97457
€16,47
Code: 97457
kippa světle modrá
New
In stock
Code: 97456
€16,47

Light blue textile kippa with white lining.

Code: 97456
Knit blue kippa with hem
New Tip
Momentálně nedostupné
Code: 92998
€16,47
Code: 92998
Textile  shiny orange kippa
In stock
Code: 97461
€16,47
Code: 97461
Textile dark blue kippa
New Tip
In stock
Code: 97454
€16,47
Code: 97454
Textile dark green kippa
New Tip
In stock
Code: 97459
€16,47
Code: 97459
Textile light blue kippa
New Tip
Momentálně nedostupné
Code: 97455
€16,47
Code: 97455
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Kippah (כיפה) [pl. kippot] and yarmulke (יארמלקע) are the names for a traditional Jewish head covering which is based on Jewish traditions and religion. Wearing of this head covering is considered to be a sign of devoutness. Religious women may cover their head as well, though they usually wear a scarf for this purpose (in some Liberal and Progressive Jewish communities they however wear a kippah during a prayer too).

 

According to the Talmud wearing a kippah reminds us of G-d as a Higher Authority above us. Etymology of the Yiddish word yarmulke comes from Aramaic, yira malkah, which literally means 'awe of the King.' According to traditions one wears a kippah in order not to stand naked in front of G-d. History of wearing a kippah dates back to the destruction of the Second Temple and according to some sources it resembles head covering of the High Priest. Wearing a kippah became common during the Middle Ages. Head covering is mentioned in Talmudic tractates Shabbat and Kiddushin and in Shulchan Aruch according which religious man 'should not walk more than four cubits bareheaded.'

 

Wearing a kippah varies in dependence on Jewish denominations. While Orthodox Jews always wear a kippah, wearing a kippah by Reform or Liberal Jews is a matter of choice. One should wear a kippah when praying, attending a Jewish cemetery, a synagogue or at a religious festivals or events. The Talmud requires wearing a kippah not only during a prayer but also during Torah study. Wearing a kippah is also a kind of statement and is considered as an outward sign of Judaism.

 

There are different types of kippot regarding their material and colour. At least since the eighteenth century, satin, velvet and cloth have been used as a material for kippot. Among the popular types are crocheted or knitted kippot (kippah sruga). Your kippah can be plained, multicoloured, patterned or may include funny motifs. In Israel, wearing a kippah also reflects social affiliation. Yemeni and Georgian Jewish communities change making kippot into a kind of art.